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Black Friday Too Stressful For Some Greenburgh Shoppers

Whether it's the hassle of crowds or money issues after Hurricane Sandy, some Greenburgh residents won't be participating in Black Friday this year.
Whether it's the hassle of crowds or money issues after Hurricane Sandy, some Greenburgh residents won't be participating in Black Friday this year. Photo Credit: Samantha Kramer
Michelle Lopez, of Irvington, said she plans on going shopping on Black Friday, even if it means getting up early and waiting in long lines.
Michelle Lopez, of Irvington, said she plans on going shopping on Black Friday, even if it means getting up early and waiting in long lines. Photo Credit: Samantha Kramer

GREENBURGH, N.Y. — Getting up at 4 a.m. to muscle through crowds and wait in long lines isn't a very pleasing idea to John Ford -  even if it means saving a little extra cash while shopping in Greenburgh on Black Friday.

The shopping holiday draws millions out to the stores during early-morning hours every year, but for some, the savings simply aren't worth the trouble.

"They put a few TVs on sale, and people kill themselves to get them," Ford said. "Not me. It's too stressful and really not worth it."

Greenburgh retail stores including Bed, Bath and Beyond will open their doors early at 6 a.m. for their usual price-slashing sales. But some Black Friday deals will start even earlier — Best Buy will open at midnight and Kmart will open its doors at 8 p.m. Thanksgiving.

Katherine Wilson of Mount Pleasant said she hasn't seen the usual hype for Black Friday like in past years, and blames it on Hurricane Sandy. The storm's victims are still busy struggling to recover and don't have time — or money — to worry about the holidays yet, she said.

"I've got a bunch of family evacuees from Long Island staying with me. They still don't have power," Wilson said. "Part of the issue is nobody's even thinking ahead for the holidays."

And according to an article in The New York Times , the retail industry has already taken a hit since the hurricane. In October, sales fell for the first time in three months by 0.3 percent, and car dealerships like the Ford Motor Corporation and Toyota estimated losing between 25,000 to 30,000 in sales after Sandy, the Times reported.

But the hassle and sleep loss is worth it to Irvington resident Michelle Lopez, who, like she does every year, plans to brave Black Friday once again. It's all about where you go, she said — the outlets are always too busy, so this year she's heading to the Palisades  Center mall in West Nyack.

"I never go for anything specific. I usually see if I can find anything extra for my family, like shoes and clothes, that are on sale," Lopez said.