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Greenburgh Daily Voice serves Ardsley, Edgemont & Greenburgh
Greenburgh Daily Voice serves Ardsley, Edgemont & Greenburgh

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Greenburgh Talks Storm Costs, How To Improve For Future

Greenburgh Public Works Deputy Commissioner Richard Fon, far left, listens to Town Supervisor Paul Feiner's concerns on how to improve the town's response to a crisis.
Greenburgh Public Works Deputy Commissioner Richard Fon, far left, listens to Town Supervisor Paul Feiner's concerns on how to improve the town's response to a crisis. Photo Credit: Samantha Kramer

GREENBURGH, N.Y. — Greenburgh Public Works Commissioner Victor Carosi estimates the department has logged up to $100,000 in overtime hours amid Hurricane Sandy's cleanup.

Carosi said crews worked around the clock — at one point rotating workers 24 hours straight — to make Greenburgh roads accessible for Con Edison. It's too soon to predict exactly how much the hurricane's cleanup will cost the town, but Carosi estimated the overtime costs could be between $60,000 to $100,000.

The DPW's next step will be to clean up the branches and debris and cut down the weak trees in danger of falling around the town. There are also still more than 80 street lights that are still blacked out by the storm.

"It was a team effort. I had everyone underneath the entire DPW department's umbrella working," Carosi said. "This is a continued process."

Deputy Commissioner Richard Fon said he was overwhelmed by town residents' support while the crews did their job. Many offered food and coffee to the workers as they cleared roads in Greenburgh's neighborhoods.

"The people have been fantastic," Fon said. "It's been a very nice experience in light of all the tragedy."

DPW is tracking its cleanup of the tremendous amount of debris, which "should" be reimbursed by FEMA, Fon said.

At its work session meeting Tuesday morning, the Greenburgh Town Board also recalled how the storm highlighted what needs to be improved by the town.

Town Supervisor Paul Feiner said what bothered him the most was the lack of a plan on how to help disabled or elderly citizens during the crisis.

"Con Ed should examine a process for people who have disabilities — a list of nursing homes, how to transport people. Then, there's a process and everybody knows what to do," Feiner said.

Feiner said he plans on listing citizens' recommendations for such a plan at the first meeting of a newly formed citizens committee on Nov. 19.

Councilman Francis Sheehan said the town is in dire need of a "debriefing" in the storm's aftermath. Government officials should know more about Con Edison's priority list so they can communicate better with frustrated residents, he said.

"There has to be a grid as to when pieces are being fixed and where. What's missing from all of this is why they are where they are," Sheehan said. "It's very frustrating not to have power, but it's even more frustrating not to have information about not having power."

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